Motion: The Cheviot, The Stag and the Black, Black Oil

That the Parliament notes that 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the first tour of the play, The Cheviot, the Stag and the Black, Black Oil; understands that it was performed by the 7:84 theatre company across the Highlands and Islands, and in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Ireland, and was written by a group of artists with many talents, including Gaelic singing and fine traditional music making; considers that it was effective in raising issues affecting the Highlands and Islands over the last few centuries, including land ownership, class divide and economic change; believes that its commentary on the cause and effect of the Highland clearances, inequitable land ownership and the discovery of North Sea oil still have relevance; considers that the arts play a vital role in political debate and thought in Scotland, particularly ahead of the 2014 independence referendum, and welcomes the work of writers and artists that articulates contemporary Scotland as well as The Cheviot, the Stag and the Black, Black Oil.

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Motion: 2014 Edinburgh International Festival

I lodged the following motion in Parliament today expressing my regret at the decision taken by the EIF to not commission any productions examining the independence referendum next year. It seems such a shame that the opportunity is being passed up by the EIF to use the event to show the role that the arts can play in the big decisions of our time, regardless of their angle or viewpoint.

That the Parliament notes with regret the reported decision taken by the director of the Edinburgh International Festival, Sir Jonathan Mills, to exclude any independence-themed productions from the 2014 event; believes that, regardless of voting intentions, the cultural sector has a massive role to play in the referendum; considers that political neutrality can be better obtained through an open, fair, and balanced programme that includes the views of all sides rather than through what it sees as enforced silence in what is universally recognised as one of the most important debates in Scotland’s history; believes this to be an act of censorship that will inadvertently politicise the festival and a wasted opportunity for Scotland’s arts community, and, in order to promote an open, healthy and vigorous debate, encourages the organisers of the Edinburgh International Festival to reconsider the decision.